Ooberman - The Magic Treehouse

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Tears From A Willow

Going down to talk to the cows

Did you bring your sandwiches?
I've got some LSD
It tastes so good outside

Did you bring your bongo drums?
I've got my old guitar
Are you happy where you are?

Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
But I won't be far away

I was sitting thinking then
Atop my grassy knoll
Like the wisest man alive

When I look at you and me
I know that things will change
So hang onto today

Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
But I won't be far away

Cause girls never last forever
But your mates'll always stick together
When you're down

Just me and my cello
Drowning in sorrow
Like tears from a willow tree

Me and my cello
Lonely and hollow
When will love find me?

I've been looking out for someone else
To fill the hole she left behind
It's not healthy, but it passes the time
Cause I'd rather play with fire than myself!

And now all the pain I'm in just fades away
I'm free to love again

Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows
Going down to talk to the cows

Like tears from a willow
Like tears from a willow
Like tears from a willow
Like tears from a willow
We're tears from a willow
We're tears from a willow

No tears from no willow
Our soft silken skin ageing
Friends like the morning
They'll always be there


Written By:
D. Popplewell
 
Found On:
The Story So Far
Sugar Bum
Tears From A Willow
The Magic Treehouse
Shorley Wall
Hey! Tour Bootleg: B-Sides
Hey! Tour Bootleg: Rare Oob
 
Quotes:
Dan: Tears From A Willow is a song that spans five years of growing up, took six months to write and ten months to record. It's all about friends, the countryside and dealing with breaking up. The setting is inspired by two significant events. Five years ago me, Andy and Steve had an amazing summer day trip in Judy Woods, Bradford, where we talked to the cows (laughing at them for being stupid), and chased perceptual bubbles in the air. Then, last year, there was an epic bongo jam with mates from another Liverpool band (Hayley's Cake), when four of us had been dumped in the same week. The words and music are an attempt to take you on a trip through friendship, into loneliness and then back out into hope. 'Cows' means cows, but also girls (sorry, I was feeling bitter). This is easily my favourite of the three Independiente singles, because it's so satisfying to hear the product of so much work and thought; obsession even. Just listen to the rubbery complexity of the bassline as it shifts and changes throughout the track - emerging after two weeks of arguing in my bedroom about the relative merits of deep pinning grooves and high-octave melodies; of trying to find the perfect balance where low root notes hit the beat then rise like throbbing serpents over drum fills. Listen to the barely audible outdoor ambience, recorded in Judy Woods where we played as kids, permeating the verses, hidden to give the subliminal feel of the open air. Listen to the distant sound of medieval horses and carts echoing a ghostly backdrop to the middle 8. Deep in the mix we've buried celtic harps, distorted rhodes piano, our rehearsal room piano, maracas, tambourines, hand claps, real flute and cello, backward phasing crash cymbals, bits of echoing ghostly Sophie that accidentally leaked over fom the very first version of Willow (which had a completely different chorus), Brian May-esque harmonised lead guitar, about 20 tracks of harmonies on the chorus (singing things like 'cooooooowwwsss' and 'gonna go down to the moo-cow pow-wow'), a squiggly synth copying the bassline on the chorus, timpanis, extra crash cymbals everywhere, an entire 8-part male-voice harmony section inspired by the film 'Seven Brides for Seven Brothers', which ended up way off in the background with distortion and echo all over it, and much much more besides. Blossoms and Million Suns, God love 'em, were nice and whistleable, but it's obvious they were written and recorded quickly. Not with the fathomless beast of Willow. The lyrics too have some of my proudest moments on the album. They're the product of months of re-writing to try and capture as best I could the feeling of friends propping each other up in a sea of sadness, full of life's mixture of warmth, depression and the ridiculous. The decision go with Willow as a single was not an easy one - after all it's plain weird, what with all its talk of drugs and cows and its minute of meanering orchestration in the middle. You'd expect it to be the last choice after a song as simple and radio-friendly as Million Suns only limped in at no. 43 in the charts. We could've played safe with the very catchy and accessible 'Amazing In Bed', or the catchy pop mosh of 'Bees', but at the end of the day it's about thinking long-term, as well as how we want to be perceived when the album's released. Catchy pop band or something a bit more ambitious? We decided to step forward boldly with the latter, an approach that that might not impress the radio but should slowly draw the attention of those who like their music to be intelligent and creative. By the way if you do catch it on the radio, ignore the line 'mushroom tea'. We slipped that in during the mixing in April, just in case 'LSD' was too much of an obvious drugs reference for radio. That's only on the radio edit - the single will be returned to its original psychedelic glory.


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