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Igloo II: Yellow Snow

All the world was Bradford shaped
Over the hill on bin bag sledges
Dodging the cowshit in our wellies

Wellington boots with holes in let the snow in
Yellow snow, yellow snow
Red robin in the mist down by the river
Yellow snow, yellow snow

Till the rain comes down and wash the snow away
(Oh, sinner man, where you gonna run to?)

And all the world was Bradford shaped
And all my friends were onion faced

Deep in the woods we found some porn
Three little boys with the horn, and I said

I'll show you mine if you show me yours
Yellow snow, yellow snow
And in the evening, felt so guilty
Yellow snow, yellow snow

Boots with holes in let the snow in
Yellow snow, yellow snow
Red robin in the mist down by the river
Yellow snow, yellow snow

'Til the rain comes down and wash the snow away
(Oh, sinner man, where you gonna run to?)
One day I'll forget, the ugly boy with the ginger hair
(Oh, sinner man...)
No one needs to know, my secret mind and the rum deeds there
(Oh, sinner man...)
I keep on running but I'm falling down
(Memories will catch in the end)
I keep on running but I'm falling down
(Oh, sinner man where you gonna run to?)
I keep on running but I'm falling down...


Written By:
D. Popplewell
 
Found On:
Tears From A Willow
Hey! Tour Bootleg: B-Sides
 
Quotes:
Dan: Yellow Snow is more personal than you'd care to know about. In fact, I think you should just listen to it and make your own minds up about the story. It's set in the same patch of Bradford as Why Did My Igloo Collapse, and maybe in the the same way it's about the beauty and wonder of winter and the impending loss of innocence that life imposes on you. My favourite bits are during the string bits - the cascading violins, twinkly bells, vocals and bassline with which I intended to evoke the feeling of sledging down a snowy hill, then the strings and brass band at the start of the second verse, meant to evoke a lost nostalgic vision of frumpy, old fashioned Yorkshire, in a 40s Ealing comedy kind of way (you'd expect a bobby to cycle past at any minute and tip his helmet). The song also contains one of my favourite ever lines: 'Red robin in the mist down by the river' - a snapshot of the way I felt about Judy woods in my childhood. I'm extremely proud of this song - the way it wraps up a guilty core in innocence and beauty - like the incongruity of singing 'porn' over tinkly bells and cascading strings. Its finely woven contradictions mirror those of childhood experiences. On the surface you could say that it's weird or bitty, too jokey or even badly executed (we worked really fast on this recording - my singing and the production fidelity ain't what they should be), but that would be to overlook all the strangely entwined layers of meaning and emotion hidden beneath. Sophia: The things I love about Yellow Snow... well. It feels to me like a picture, painted with words and music. And like a journey or adventure that you walk into. I see this song as a huge painting of the countryside in winter and when the music begins, you lean through the picture frame and step inside the story. And once inside, it takes you back to a precious time in childhood, you remember the world through a child's eyes, and you feel it. It is so evocative. "All the world was Bradford shaped" is so simple but it sums up so perfectly how tiny your world is when you're a child. "Red robin in the mist down by the river" is such a beautiful line cos it rolls off the tongue, is sweet on the ear and summons up the ultimate image of snow in winter. This song has so much atmosphere it hurts. Also one more thing... I love the rhythm it goes into on "till the rain comes down..." and how that's sustained through "sinner man..." right till the end. Ooooooh it's special.


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